Terrier dogs

Training Your Silky Dog: A Terrier Anti-Terror Basics

It is essential to have a dog that knows how to follow the right rules and how to live around your house. To achieve this, dog training must be considered.

Most people think that training a dog is hard and expensive. Moreover, dog training requires a lot of patience and creativity for your dog. We have to remember that dogs may be intelligent but they can not be as intelligent as us. The article provides some of the basic things dog owners need to know so they can do the training themselves. However, to maximize the full potential of your dog, a dog trainer should be hired instead.

What are the differences between a submissive dog and a dominant dog?

A submissive dog normally:

• avoids eye contact.
• rolls on its back.
• crouch down, ears back and tail lowered.
• is comfortable on its back in your arms.

On the other hand, a dominant dog:

• maintains eye contact.
• is unwilling to move from his place on the couch.
• dislikes grooming and petting.
• is possessive of dishes and toys.

Training your silky terriers requires kindness and consistency. Silkys respond actively to praises and to rewards. In addition, they become harsh and unresponsive towards punishments and animosity, respectively.

Trainings with obedience classes can be intensely beneficial in petting your silky terriers. In many dog training schools, classes for puppies are available. Young dogs are taught to get accustomed with other dogs and people using limited trainings. However, there are areas that do not conduct formal obedience training unless the dog is at least half a year old. Always remember that a dog is never too old to benefit from training when a good trainer is available, or if the owner is fully committed to the task.

Here are the recommended ways of training silky terriers:

1. Reiteration or Repetition

Reiteration is the name of the dog training game. In here, dogs are asked to do a task over and over again to achieve mastery. Dog tricks are best learned when reiterated and reinforced through rewards.

2. Persistence

Patience is a virtue that requires you to tolerate hardships. Persistence is trying to be patient for a longer time until a goal is achieved. Apparently, dog training requires a lot of persistence from the owner or from the trainer Physical and psychological aspects of the owner and/or the trainer must be sound.

3. Commendation and Amendation

Simply put, if a dog does the right thing, it should be said aloud. Otherwise, the dog should hear, « No, that’s not it! » when the trick is not complete or appropriate for the command given. These words reinforce correct responses and diminish the unwanted ones.

4. Rewarding

Bits of cheese would really be good treats for dogs who responded correctly to a given command. Other food can be bought at pet sores. However, if you are able to get the respect of your pet, commands will be executed even if there are no longer involved treats. Likewise, these things reinforce warranted responses.

If your lifestyle permits being in charge of training your own pet, you can do the training as long as you have gathered enough patience and commitment by:

1. spending time grooming your dog.
2. having regular training times on the leash.
3. stroking its belly and toes and rolling it on its back
4. hand feeding some food to ensure that the pet is taking treats gently and slowly.

In asserting dominance, always practice consistency and firmness. Afterwards, you can be a master and a dear friend to your own pet.

The Stylish and Reserved Dog: Scottish Terrier

The Scottish terriers, also known as Scotties, are short-legged British terriers. They are one among other go-to-ground and wire-coated terriers developed in the highlands of Scotland. The Scotties are said to have jaunty attitude so they are often used to represent advertisements of the country to where they originated.

However, Scotties’ nature is not in coherence with their public image or trademark. In fact, Scotties are like the citizens of his native land who are independent, stoic, and fiercely loyal to their masters. They also adhere much to their own privacy.

Scotties, Westies, and Cairns are very similar regarding their appearance. The Westies and the Cairns are, in fact, closely-related. The Westie can be considered as the white variety of the Cairn who has a coat of any color but white. Westies are hybrids of white dogs crossed with Cairns of western Scotland. Scotties, however, have longer heads and bodies, have generally dark coats and are aloof than the other two.

The following are some of the basic facts breeders would really love to know about Scotties:

Category: Terrier

Living Environment: either outdoor or indoor (mostly preferred by breeders)

Coat: wiry, short (about 2 inches) and thick

Colors: iron gray or steel, black, wheaten, or sandy; the coat may also be brindled or grizzled

Height: about 10 inches

Weight: between 18 and 20 pounds

Temperament: they need to be praised frequently and they adapt with the moods of the household

Breeders should note of the following health issues:
• Von Willibrand’s disease (VWD), an inherited disorder
• Flea allergies and other skin problems
• Epilepsy
• Jawbone disorders
• Scottie cramp, a minor condition that causes walking difficulties
• Cerebellar abiotrophy, a slow-to-progress and rare neurological disease that causes loss of coordination

Care and Exercise:
• Their coats need special care to maintain its appearance and texture. It is suggested that they should be subjected to professional grooming once or twice each year for their coats to stay wiry and firm.
• The fur needs to be combed a couple of times in each week and even needs occasional trimming.
• Scotties’ dead hairs should be plucked out through stripping. Using electric clippers will only make their coats dull and soft.
• Play with them. Hunting and squeaky balls and toys are their favorites.
• They should be on leash while walking in public places.

Origin/History:

The origins of the breed are obscure. It was noted that forerunners of Scotties were sent to France’s Royal Highness by King James I of England during the 16th century. Later on, three different terriers were revealed as Scotch Terriers, which included the Westies, the Cairns, and the Scotties. The Dandie Dinmont variety had also been noted as closely-related to the abovementioned terriers but its apparent physical differences categorized itself as a separate breed.

Terrier dogs that were bred in Britain were developed to hunt vermin that ate grains, and pestered eggs and poultry farms. Most breeds grew as scrappy and courageous dogs and were trained to follow badgers or foxes into their dens. Their wiry coats and soft undercoats protected them against rugged terrains and harsh climates.

If you want to have a Scottie in your life, you should not be impulsive about the matter for animosity and lack of proper training will only harm and traumatize the dog. If properly taken cared of, this breed can even appoint itself as a guardian of the family. It can also be fiercely loyal, that is it can protect you even if it means endangering its own life.

To this effect, I guess you must agree that a Scottie is a dog that is second to none.

The Popular Pet and Lap Dog: Yorkshire Terrier

The Yorkshire terriers, or Yorkies, originated from Scotland but bred in England. They were molded to hunt rats, but nowadays they are popular as pets. In fact, their variety was one of the Top Dog Breeds of 2005.

They usually grow being small and light varieties. Hence, owners do not mind having their pets on their lap almost all day. Moreover, this usual bonding activity usually transforms this lap dog into a bright, playful, and loyal companion pet.

The following are some of the basic facts breeders would really love to know about Yorkies:

Category: Toy (Terrier)

Living Environment: indoors (highly recommended); outdoors (fenced yard)

Coat: silky, glossy, long and fine; no undercoat

Colors: black when young but they attain the colors tan and blue as they mature
.
Height: between 8 and 9 inches

Weight: between 3 and 7 pounds

Temperament:

Naturally,

• they are territorial and like their privacy to be respected
• they are intelligent and fearless
• they are assertive and independent

When properly trained,

• they develop close affinity with older children
• they become really playful and lively
• they become extremely affectionate
• they do not mind having other pets at home
• they focus much of their attention and affection toward their owner

Breeders should note of the following health issues:

• Alopecia, or losing hair
• Cataract, or loss of transparency of one or both lenses of the eyes
• Cryptorchidism, wherein testicles do not descend into the scrotum
• Dwarfism
• Entropion, a disorder with the eyelid; lashes on the eyelid that irritate the eyeballs could lead to other complications
• Glaucoma, a condition that causes an increase pressure within the eye
• Hydrocephalus
• Keratoconjunctivitis sicca, or the reduction of tear production
• Low blood sugar
• Patellar luxation, a disorder in the kneecap
• Portosystemic shunt, or the accumulation of blood toxins in the liver
• Urolithiasis, an infection of the urinary tract leading to the formation of bladder stones.

Care and Exercise:
• They require daily grooming.
• Ears and eyes must be cleaned and checked regularly.
• Dental hygiene must be regularly maintained.
• They are fit only for short strides.
• They should have a regular play time while lying under the sunbeams, chasing shadows, and joining tug-of-war.

Origin/History:

In the 19th century, a number of weavers from Scotland migrated to England and brought with them different terriers that were bred to hunt rats. Through time, these terriers were crossed and terriers with « broken hairs » were produced.

In 1870, a « broken-haired Scotch terrier » was named as a Yorkshire terrier by a reporter. He argued that the breed should be called as such because his types were bred in a town called Yorkshire.

Though the Yorkies were originally bred as working dogs, they became fashionable pets is England in the latter part of the Victorian era. In 1972, Yorkies were brought to the United States and became the country’s favorite pet.

You can say that the Yorkies developed into tough breeds because of their ancestors’ reputation as rat-hunters. However, their size, and playful and bright character have actually captured the attention and affection of most pet owners. Most proud owners would boast that they have the great giants inside the bodies of these little dogs. If you want a small but terrible breed of dog, grab a Yorkie now! Just a friendly reminder, they would really need your attention and companionship than any other terriers.

Some Facts about Silky Terrier Pet Dogs

Dogs have always been man’s best friend. Nowadays, however, human-canine relations have been rather strained mainly because of apartment living. Many people today live in condominiums or apartment building where pets aren’t allowed. Because of this, people realize that they either need to get another place or to get one of the robot dogs that many companies are selling today. There is, however, an alternative -many people today are getting “toy” pet dos like silky terriers.

These “toy” dogs are the way to go if you want the warmth and companionship of a pet dog without the hassles. In this article, we are going to discuss the many virtues of having a silky terrier pet dog.

One of the best characteristics of the silky terrier is its coat. If you have a silky terrier pet dog, the first thing you will notice about is the way that it coat shines. A silky terrier’s coat is actually where it gets the name from since its coat is straight and silky. One of the main reasons why dogs aren’t allowed in apartment buildings is because of fur shedding. Some dogs have the tendency to shed their coats and leave clumps of fur lying around the house. This can be very messy if not outright disgusting.

One of the virtues of having a silky terrier pet dog is the fact that its coat really doesn’t shed. This means that people can be sure that their pet dog does not leave a furry mess when it explores a room. Thus, your carpeting is safe from dog fur.

Naturally alert and friendly, the silky terrier can make an excellent watchdog because of its terrier nature. It is friendly, but a silky terrier pet dog can be quite possessive with their family. It does not really like to be left alone for long periods of time and would behave their best when someone is always home with it.

One thing you need to keep silky terriers as pet dogs is commitment. The coat of the silky terrier is prone to matting and tangles, which means that you need to brush it regularly. It also needs to be shampooed regularly in order to maintain the shine of the coat. Care should also be taken with the throat sine a silky terrier pet dog has especially sensitive trachea. You see how much attention a silky terrier pet dog requires?

Training can also be quite a challenge since a silky terrier pet dog may be difficult to housebreak. People who own one agree that it takes a lot of energy to properly train a silky terrier pet dog. A silky terrier pet dog, however, will do well in training if a choke collar is not used. The trainer needs to be firm but just to the animal.

A silky terrier pet dog can also be full of energy. This means that you need to constantly keep it occupied with activities. Boredom is one of the enemies of the silky terrier pet dog. It likes to be given the chance to run and play but it also is very suitable for an apartment. You also need to keep a silky terrier pet dog occupied socially.

A silky terrier pet dog may be a handful, but it is perfect if you want a little ball of fun to keep you company.

Why Own a Norfolk Terrier Dog as Pet

If you are planning to get a Norfolk terrier pet dog, here are some things you should know:

The Norfolk terrier originated from England. It is actually very affectionate and does not exhibit a disagreeable nature. Because of this, many people like to keep them as pets. However, there can be quite some difficulty housetraining a Norfolk terrier pet dog. This is because of the fact that a Norfolk terrier pet dog can be quite stubborn. The best method recommended for this breed is crate training.

What is crate training? Well, it involves training your Norfolk terrier pet dog to stay in a crate when it is left unsupervised. Used humanely, a crate can be a great den for your Norfolk terrier pet dog. This will help your Norfolk terrier pet dog when it needs some sort of privacy or alone time. This will also train your Norfolk terrier pet dog not to soil around the house. One advantage of crate training is the fact that you can be reassured that your pet will be safe even if it is left unsupervised. Traveling will also be much more comfortable, since your Norfolk terrier pet dog will have adjusted to his den.

A Norfolk terrier pet dog does not naturally shed its fur. This fact has a good side and a bad side. On the good side, no shedding means no mess. This means that they can be kept indoors without risk of leaving fur on your floor. However, you do need to take your Norfolk terrier pet dog to a groomer twice a year in order to strip the coat. This is done in order to promote the growth of a new weather-resistant coat. In a sense, this allows your Norfolk terrier pet dog to freshen up.

In order to properly care for the coat of your Norfolk terrier pet dog, you need to brush it at least twice a day. This will help get rid of tangles and prevent matting.

Ideally, a Norfolk terrier pet dog should be kept in a place with a fenced yard so that it can have a large space to romp around. This is because of the fact that Norfolk terrier pet dogs thrive on activity. Boredom for this breed usually leads to destruction so you should try to keep it occupied.

The best quality that a Norfolk terrier pet dog exhibits is the ability to get along with other pets. They also love children. This means that kids will have a lot of fun with a Norfolk terrier pet dog. You should be careful however, as Norfolk terrier pet dogs may perceive smaller animals as prey.

One thing that may be admired in a Norfolk terrier pet dog is the fact that though it is not aggressive, it is generally a courageous breed. Because of this, a Norfolk terrier pet dog can make an excellent watchdog. Another factor that contributes to this is the fact that a Norfolk terrier pet dog is usually very alert and will bark immediately to alert the family.

Before you get a Norfolk terrier pet dog, you need to make sure that you gather as much information as possible. By understanding the different aspects of the Norfolk terrier pet dog, you will make sure that you have the ability to care for one.

A Dog in One Pack- Jack Russell Terrier

We basically want to find companions who would give us most of the benefits we think we need. Well, if you are looking for a dog that is somewhat a one-in-package pal, you might find Jack Russell Terriers interesting enough.

This dog has a history that is somehow loomed to give rise to the specie.

It was said that the breeder of this dog, a young Theologian student of Oxford University named John Russell once met a milkman with a white terrier that has spots on his eyes and ears. This dog became his interest which later proved to be his foundation for breeding a new dog breed that many has learned to love as pets. The dog he first saw was named « Trump » from which another 60 types of terriers were later bred from.

With a terrier’s basic nature to go on and over the ground (terrier by the way came from the Latin term « terra » which means earth), Jack Russell terriers also have the disposition to hunt and scour for hunting. Thus, they should be given enough grooming so as to set off the dirt they gather from digging soil to either bury a treasure or to recover a hidden treasure kept long ago.

An excellent ratter, Jack Russell Terriers proves to be good « housekeepers » since they keep most rats away from home. Any unlucky rat that happens to be inside the quarters of this terrier is sure to meet its instant doom. Thus, owners find themselves with both a dog and cat in one pal.

One basic character of this dog is its disposition towards strangers. They can easily figure out who must be kept away from their homes and who can be accepted inside the house. This very attitude also makes them good watchdogs. They were designed specifically to be aggressive on preys. And while they can be very vocal, many of them only barks when they find good reason to.

They do not appear vicious though. But once they smell threat, they can show off aggressiveness that could serve as warning towards the strangers. However, once the stranger is let into the house by the owner, a Jack Russell can already tolerate his or her presence.

This terrier is also a family dog and desires for human companionship. And their love for children is significantly interesting. However, once they are abused or had been shown improper treatments, may it be intentional or accidental, they can react through aggressive behaviors. Their aggressiveness is further manifested with their lack of fear towards larger dogs which can unfortunately lead to injuries, some can even be fatal.

They are also marked for their intelligence and good spirit. These characteristics can be highly observable through their curiosity in things. Thus, they require supplementation on formal training unless you can tolerate difficult behaviors. The good thing though with Jack Russell is that it can acknowledge training and do well in most of them. In fact, they are known to champion various ring shows and other similar competitions.

The Hollywood has recognized the disposition of these dogs too. Coupled with feisty and good physical characteristics, this pal has already made names in the screens. If Wishbone, Milo (from The Mask) and Eddie (from the Frasier) ring the bell on you then there is no doubt that you can recognize this dog.

Jack Russell fair well with grooming. A dog of relatively small size, this breed will not tax you with grooming needs.

The Dog of the Highlands: West Highland White Terrier

At around 1700s, the Isle of Skye and other highlands in Scotland were already producing lots of small terriers. Scottish breeds were separated into two: the Skye terriers and the Dandie Dinmont terriers.

The Dandie Dinmonts were categorized as a separate breed. The Skyes included the Scotties, the Cairns and the West highland white terriers or the Westies.

It was also noted that these terriers were the hybrids among the crossed Cairns, Scottish, and Dandies terriers. One could assume that the hybrid would really be loyal and its hunting instincts could not be belittled. In fact, many royalties in Scotland owned terriers that were very similar to the Westies of today.

Another remarkable story is about a Westie that stopped a mother from constantly yelling at her daughter. Every time the mother would yell at her teenage daughter, the Westie would attack the mother. The aggression of the dog got worse over the years that resulted in the mother’s complete inability to scold her teenager.

It turned out that the girl was actually rewarding the dog for his protection by calming and soothing him down after every « threat » from her mother. Many would perceive that the daughter was able to help her mother to change her ways when in fact she was helping herself by rewarding the dog for its behavior.

The following are some of the basic facts breeders would really love to know about Westies:

Category: Terrier
Living Environment: indoors (highly recommended); outdoors (fenced yard)

Coat: about two-inch coarse and wiry outer coat and soft, dense, and furry undercoat
Color: white

Height: between 10 and 12 inches

Weight: between 13 and 22 pounds

Temperament:

Naturally,

• they like to bark and dig
• they are not as willful like most terriers
• they love companionship

When properly trained

• they can become fairly friendly towards strangers
• they develop close affinity with behaved children
• they love to chase cats but they do not hurt them
• they can become a very good watch dog
• they can become very lively

Breeders should note of the following health issues:

• Chronic skin problems
• Perthe’s disease (hip problems)
• Jawbone calcification
• Cranio mandibular osteopathy (lion jaw)
• Patella luxation, a disorder in the kneecap
• Liver ailments
• Deafness
• Congenital heart disease

Care and Exercise:

• Their coat should be brushed regularly using a brush with stiff bristles.
• They should bathe only when necessary.
• Their whole coat should be stripped at least twice a year and trimmed every four months.
• The fur on the eyes and ears should be trimmed using blunt-nose mirrors.
• They will surely be more agile and healthy after regular sessions of play and/or walk.

Origin/History:

As noted, they share the same lineage with Cairns and Scotties (from Skye terriers), and even with the Dandies. This trio was developed in the Isle of Skye, which was one of the highlands in Scotland. It was noted that white whelps were chosen from the wiry-coated Cairns, Scotties, and Dandies to produce the variety that were known as Poltalloch terriers.

Following are some items in the history that show the Westies’ reputation of being owners’ favorite companion dogs.

Records in the history mentioned that around 1620, King James 1 of England requested some small white dogs from Argyleshire in Scotland. Colonel Malcolm, who was considered as the originator of Poltalloch terriers, that are very similar to the Westies of today, accidentally shot his terrier (a dark one). From then on he vowed to have only white terriers.

In the 19th century, terriers that were very similar to the Westies were known as Roseneath terriers in honor of Duke of Argyll’s interest and patronage of this breed. Roseneath was the name of his estate at Dumbartonshire.

In the first-ever dog show that were organized in the late 1800s, the Westies were called as White Scottish terriers. In 1904, they were classified under the name West Highland White terriers.

During the mid-1900s, breeders of the Cairns in Argyll, Scotland selected white puppies from the stock and interbreed some to obtain white Cairns. However, in 1917, the American Kennel Club ruled that Cairns could be listed if they have the Westies’ lineage.

We can say the history repeats itself for this delightful terrier is now mostly a favorite companion dog of many households.

Caring for Your Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier Pet Dog

The soft coated wheaten terrier would be considered by most people to be “high maintenance”. This means that a lot of care should be given to it in order to maintain its stature. This statement also means that a lot of steps should be taken in order to care for the dog properly. So how do you care for your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog?

Let us first talk about the coat. This is one of the most distinguishing characteristics of a soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog. In fact, when you take a look at the name, you will realize that the coat gives the dog its identity. Taking care of this essential part of the soft coated wheaten terrier dog can be quite a daunting task. This is especially true if you have just found out about the various standards that people use to judge the beauty of a soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog.

Frequent grooming is required to keep the coat shiny and to prevent matting. It also helps get rid of any accumulated dirt. You should comb or brush your soft coated wheaten terrier dog everyday to make sure that his coat remains silky and tangle-free. The coat also needs to be trimmed once in a while to preserve the “terrier look” and to allow a new coat to grow.

Besides the coat, you should also take care of the nails and teeth of your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog. In case that you do not know what to do by yourself, you might want to hire some professional dog grooming services to do the job for you.

Another aspect you should concentrate on is the training. Remember to train your soft coated wheaten terrier dog as early as possible in order to ingrain in him the basics of proper behavior. There are several keywords that should come to your mind when training your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog:

1) Consistency – be consistent with your teaching. Do not use different commands in order to get the same response as this will only serve to confuse your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog. You should also be consistent in terms of reward and punishment. This will help your dog understand what you want to happen.

2) Tone – a soft coated wheaten terrier dog is actually pretty sensitive to the tones in the human voice. This means that the dog will be able to tell if you are feeling upset or if you are feeling impatient. You need to learn how to moderate your tone in order to avoid confusion with your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog.

3) Timing -learn the proper timing of when to correct your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog. The element you need during correction is surprise. You need to correct the soft coated wheaten terrier for a mistake right after or even before it performs the act. This way, you will be able to instill a sense of consequence into your soft coated wheaten terrier pet dog.

Caring and training for your soft coated wheaten terrier can be quite a bit of work. You will also have to contend with the energy inherent in every terrier breed. However, with patience, your efforts will be rewarded.

The Playful and Inquisitive Dog: Cairn Terrier

The Cairn is assumed as one of the subcategories of Scotland’s terriers along with the Westies (West Highland White) and the Scottish, The Westies and the Cairns are highly related. For one, Westies are hybrids of white dogs crossed with Cairns of western Scotland. The Westie can be considered as the white variety of the Cairn who has a coat of any color but white. Scotties, however, have longer heads and bodies, have generally dark coats and are aloof than the other two. These dogs originated from the short-haired Skyes.

Cairn is the smallest breed among the terrier group. The name Cairn was coined after the small stone piles that marked borders of Scottish farms and graves. During the early times, this breed was used to guide small animals into these piles of stones. However, cairns are strong and sturdy but are not heavy.

This dog was already present during the 1500s even before it became popular in 1930, after the appearance of “Toto” in “The Wizard of Oz” as Dorothy’s companion dog. Presently, like the American pit bull terriers, Cairns are used as companion dogs. Among the variety’s talents are tracking, watching over the house, hunting, and performing tricks and sports regarding competitive obedience.

The following are some of the basic facts breeders would really love to know about Cairns:

Category: Terrier

Living Environment: indoors (highly recommended); outdoors (fenced yard)

Coat: shaggy and coarse outer coat and short and soft furry undercoat

Colors: any color except white

Height: between 9.5 and 10 inches

Weight: between 13 and 14 pounds

Temperament: like most terriers that were bred as hunters, these dogs are mischievous, alert, restless and high-spirited; also have a special connection with children age six and above

Breeders should note of the following health issues:

• Atopy, a type of allergy
• Cataract, or loss of transparency of one or both lenses of the eyes
• Cryptorchidism, wherein testicles do not descend into the scrotum
• Glaucoma, a condition that causes an increase pressure within the eye
• Patellar luxation, a disorder in the kneecap

Care and Exercise:

• Daily brushing is recommended to prevent tangles and mats.
• Hair around ears and eyes must be trimmed regularly.
• Do not over feed them as they gain weight easily.
• Their physique requires a regular exercise routine which includes a daily play time while on leash.
• They should be on leash while walking in public places because of their hunting instincts.

Origin/History:

As already noted, the Cairns were existent since around the 1500s. At around 1700s, the Isle of Skye and other highlands in Scotland were already producing lots of small terriers. Scottish breeds were separated into two: the Skye terriers and the Dandie Dinmont terriers.

The Dandie Dinmonts were categorized as a separate breed. The Skyes included the Scotties, the Westies, and the Cairns.

In the year 1912, the Cairns receive their official name based on their excellent ability to hunt down vermin such as otters, foxes, and badgers that were hiding in cairns. However, it was in the year 1913 when they received the official recognition from the American Kennel Club.

The Cairn terrier is one heck of an agile little dog that is very appropriate for the whole family. This breed is playful, prying, and is always ready to join the fun. If you are still not convinced, just reckon how Dorothy was entertained and accompanied by this type of dog.

Some Information Regarding Cairn Terrier Pet Dogs

If you are thinking of getting a Cairn terrier pet dog, then you need to know some information about it first. Why? Well, knowing the right information about anything will help you in the long run. This is especially true when we are talking about a pet ownership. Before you get a Cairn terrier pet dog, you need to be sure that you know what you are getting yourself into. You need to know how to take proper care of your cairn terrier pet dog and you also need to know what to expect when you are getting one.

Thankfully, there are a lot of sites on the internet which can provide you the necessary information. To save you some time, however, here are the basics:

Originally bred in the Scottish highlands, the Cairn terrier is the smallest of all terrier breeds. You should not let the size deceive you when you are getting a Cairn terrier pet dog, however. The Cairn terrier was first bred because of its working ability. You know what this means? This means energy.

A Cairn terrier pet dog has a lot of energy to spare. They can gain a lot from taking brisk walks daily. However, you should know that they do best when they have a fenced-in yard to play in. This way, they get more room when they play. Their high energy also means that they aren’t really suitable for apartment or condo living. If you live in such places, then having a Cairn terrier pet dog is not for you.

Their energy may also put them in danger. This is the reason why you need to make sure that a Cairn terrier pet dog stays in one area. Their natural instincts tell them to dig and run and these activities may lead to accidents if unsupervised.

There are, however, a lot of positive things that can be said about a Cairn terrier pet dog’s energy. For one thing, it makes the dog fun to play with. It can play for hours on end, giving you the companionship that you want. Another positive with this energy is the fact that this energy can be channeled into good purposes. A Cairn terrier pet dog is naturally inquisitive and is always willing to participate in a new adventure. This means that a Cairn terrier pet dog can be easily taught to do tricks. They learn tricks very fast and thrive in obedience training.

You need to make sure that your Cairn terrier pet dog is trained properly since untrained ones have a tendency to be destructive when they are bored.

Let us talk about the proper care for a Cairn terrier pet dog. One thing you do not need to worry about is its coat. The Cairn terrier pet dog was not bred for the beauty of its coat. The coat of a Cairn terrier pet dog is weather resistant and sheds little to no fur. Because of this, it can be a great indoor pet.

Being the smallest of terrier breeds, however, makes Cairn terrier pet dogs especially vulnerable to various health problems. Care must be taken when feeding it as it can gain weight quite rapidly. A Cairn terrier pet dog is also especially sensitive to fleas. However, you can be sure that this is one of the best breeds around.