Candles

Waxing Light: How To Make Home-made Candles

Candles often summons up images of an older and more archaic time. I mean, candles are candles, right? Well, nowadays, candles are actually pretty big business. Just look what we scramble for when the power goes out. Flashlights are great, but candles are built to light up a room and that’s what they do best. This is not to mention the aromatic candle market, which services aromatherapy clinics and romantic couples the world over.

It may sound surprising but candlemaking is actually pretty easy. It should be no surprise since everyone used to learn it, along with soapmaking and sewing. It’s gradually become a lost art in the public domain, but quite a few hobbyists indulge in it and earn a pretty penny doing it. Here’s a few tips if you want to go into the candlemaking hobby.

To start out you are going to need a double boiler. It may sound like some fancy technical cooking item, but it all boils down to a clean coffee can set inside a large low bowl with water in it. Of course, there are actual double boilers that can be bought on the market but if you’re looking to save a little, what I described should do the trick. The important things is to have the water level at somewhere that the coffee can doesn’t just float. It should be there in the middle, steady as a rack.

If you’ve got that ready, here’s what you look for next: some molds for your candles. Candle molds are also publically available and can be bought, but if you’re really aiming for the home-made style, a few bowls or some cups should do the trick. If you’re looking to make those tall, long candles that you often see sold, well, then you better go for those molds, but candles in unique shapes are more fun. Just make sure that the mouth of your mold is wide so that the candles would be easy to extract once they harden. Smearing vegetable oil on the inside of the molds should help a lot in this.

Next on your list is the material components: wax and wicks. You can get commercial paraffin wax at any well-stocked department or specialty store. They’re usually sold in large half-pound chunks and one should be enough for your needs. Thick cotton string should be enough to use for wicks. It would be good to prepare the wax and wicks before hand; the wax by chopping it into smaller, easy to manage chunks, and the wicks by cutting two inches longer than your mold.

Now that you’ve got all of your materials, here’s what you do.

1. Set up the double boiler on the stove.
2. Place the wax chunks in the central can as the boiler heats up. This should weigh down the can enough so you can place more water in the outer bowl.
3. Wait for the wax to melt. It should take about thirty or so minutes for all of the chunks you placed into the can to become fully liquid. Constantly mix it with a wooden stick or spoon.
4. Keep a tight watch on the boiler. Wax is flammable and if you see it starting to simmer or boil then it’s time to turn off that stove. If it does catch fire, place a lid on it and turn off the stove.
5. After turning off the stove, let it cool for one or two minutes.
6. Use tongs to pour the wax into the molds. Always pour in the direction of the mold so as to avoid spillage.
7. Place the wicks immediately, then let the wax harden and settle for a few hours.

And there you go, seven easy steps to make your own candles at home. So what are you waiting for? Go out and make a little light in your life.

Lighting Up: How To Make Your Own Candles

Creating home-made candles is one of those skills that our pioneering ancestors learned as they grew up, along with soapmaking, sewing and a whole lot of other things. Learning this skill is actually pretty easy and it translates well into our modern world. If you’re looking for a nice little hobby that can save you a dollars and relax you a little, here’s some basic pointer for starting out making some candles in your own home.

Now that you’re gonna begin, here’s what you need: a whole lot of wax; you can easily obtain this any well-stocked department store or hobby store. Paraffin is what you’ll be getting, of course, and it has been the candle standard for well over a hundred years. You can try using wax from other sources, like beeswax and soywax – but paraffin is cheaper and easy to find. You can also look around for wax drippings and candle stubs – used candles can easily be recycled and should tell you how you can use any of your used home-made candles in the future.

Next, you’ll need a few molds for your candles. Specialty stores can provide some ready made molds but if you’re pinching pennies, some old cups or similar objects can be used as molds. Just make sure your opening is large enough so you can get your candles out easily. Smearing some vegetable oil beforehand or papering the insides with waxpaper can also make getting your candles out of the molds a lot easier.

Next, you’ll need some wicks. Tough, thick cotton string can be used for this. Just cut the string at two or three inches more than your mold and pull them out on some wax paper or hang the wicks from a clothesline to assure you that they’ll be straight when it’s time to use them.

Finally, you’ll need a double boiler. It sounds fancy but all it comes down to is to have a smaller metal container inside a larger bowl filled with water. Make sure that your inner container is stable and isn’t floating on the water. A large coffee can or something similar would do the trick. Now place the entire set-up on a stove and you’ve got your double boiler.

Once you’ve set this up, you chop or cut the wax into smaller, easy-to-handle pieces. You just place them into the center boiler – no need to wait for things to heat up, the wax will mix anyway. Stir the wax mixture using a wooden spoon or something similar and be attentive. Wax is very flammable and if you hear any sputtering or simmering in the waxy mixture, better turn off the stove. If it does go up in flames, put a lid on it and turn off the stove – pouring water on a wax fire ruins the wax. Finally, if you’ve used old candles, strain for the used wicks in the mix – they’ll be easily seen in a clear wax mix.

If the wax is starting to boil, turn off the stove and let it cool for awhile. A minute or so should be enough time – just enough to give you a chance to ready your molds. Use tongs – that can is still hot – and pour the mixture in the direction of the mold so as to avoid nasty spills. After that all you have to do is stick the wicks in to the cooling wax and wait for a few hours.

Now you can pry your candles out of your molds and be proud of the results of your home-based candlemaking.

Cooking Up Some Candles: How To Make Your Own Candles At Home

The kitchen used to be used for other things than cooking in the days of the pioneers. Soapmaking, candlemaking and a lot of other things happenened in what is technically a house’s own chemical laboratory. If you want to have a bit of that pioneering spirit, making candles is one of the easier hobbies to do in a kitchen other than cooking. This is mostly because candlemaking is essentially all about cooking wax.

If you want to start to make some candles, you start off with a double boiler. A double boiler is easy to set-up without any extra purchases. All it consists of is an old cleaned-up coffee can, a large, low, boiling pot and some water. Place the pot on a stove, place the coffee can in it and then fill the outer pot with some water. Make sure that your can is heavy enough and the water low enough so that it isn’t floating and you have your double boiler.

Next, you’ll need a few other things: a few molds, wax and some wicks. Candle molds are actually sold in well-stocked shops, though if you’ve a got a lot of extra cups and bowls, they can serve in a pinch. Make sure, of course, that your molds can stand hot mixtures and have wide, open mouths. This is so that when it’s time to get your candles out of the molds, they’re easy to pull out. Placing a layer of waxpaper in them beforehand can also help greatly. Vegetable oil can also be used as a separator.

Wax and wicks are easy. Paraffin wax is available as half-pound chunks in stores. If you’re feeling exotic, you can get beeswax or soy wax from specialty hobby stores but they cost a pretty penny. Better settle for paraffin since it’s easily available and cheap. Thick cotton strings are what commercial companies use for their candle wicks and there’s nothing wrong with them, so better look to using those two. Some preparation beforehand is necessary here. Chopping the paraffin into easy to handle cubes or pieces helps with the wax-melting process and cutting the string into long wicks beforehand makes it easy for when the time comes that you put them into the hardening candles.

Now that you’ve got all of these and prepped the ingredients, it’s time to turn on the stove. You can actually place the wax chunks into the central can before starting the stove – this also weighs down the can so you can pour more water in the outer boiler. Now all you have to do now is wait. Melting down the wax completely should take about thirty to forty minutes. Once the wax has mostly melted, you can start stirring with a long wooden stick or something similar. Never use an actual cooking utensil when cooking the wax; paraffin is notoriously difficult to remove and tasting wax in a casserole isn’t exactly appetizing. Also take note that wax is very flammable – avoid nearby open flames and keep a close watch on the mixture. If it starts to boil or sputter, it’s time to turn off the stove and start the cooling process. If it does happen to catch fire, just put a lid on it and turn off the stove. Water on a wax fire just makes it worse.

After the mixture has cooled for a minute or two, it’s time to pour the wax into the molds. Use tongs or something similar to pour the wax in – it is still very hot and we do not want any accidents. Pouring in the direction of the molds, away from you, also helps avoid this and spatterinng. Old newspapers laid out underneath the molds should also help speed up clean-up times.

Finally, all you have to do now is place the wicks and wait for the wax to cool. And there you have it, you’ve cooked up your first batch of home-made candles. Wasn’t that easy? So better try doing it again – future variations can have perfume or dyes added to the wax mixture to create colored or scented candles.

Candles At Home: Candlemaking Made Simple

There are quite a few skills that you can learn that will help give you a bit of fun and a few savings in these tough times we have. Candlemaking is one of those skills, along with sopamaking and a sewing. One of the advantages of candlemaking though is that kids just love doing it. It’s simple enough that children can probably get a handle of it easily and you can have quite a bit of quality with your young ones as you go about teaching them the art of making candles.

Here’s what you need to start: you can start of with setting a double boiler. You can’t just boil wax in your favorite pot. Wax is notoriously difficult to get rid of and you’ll be playing a whole lot of wax when you start making candles. The words “double boiler” conjures images of a specialized machine that costs a lot of dollars but you just perish that thought. You can set up a double boiler by getting a large low bowl and a smaller, preferrably metal, can. You place the can inside the larger bowl and pouras much water into it as you can, while keeping the can stable. It should stand flat and not be floating. Then you place it on the stove, and you’ve got your double boiler.

Of course, we go on to the more material components of candlemaking. You’re gonna need a lot of wax. You can get your wax from any reasonably well-stocked department store; paraffin – the most basic of waxes that can be used for making candles is easily available in most of them. If you’re going for more exotic candles, bees wax and soy wax are also available in specialized hobby stores. Also, if you’re a really big penny pincher, you can recycle old candles and wax drippings easily. A good starting weight is a quarter of a pound of your preferred wax. Heat up the double boiler and drop the wax into the central can is easily manageable chunks – cut them up with scissors or knives that you won’t be using for cooking.

Now while you’re waiting for all of that wax to melt, you bettter go out and look for some molds. There are simple designer molds available in some stores but you can settle for a few old cups ot bowls – anything as long as it is easy for you to get your candles out of them later. Placing a layer of waxpaper inside your molds or vegetable oil also facilitates removal and makes sure you don’t have to break your molds to get your candles out.

Don’t forget about your melting wax though. Check on it every once in a while and stir the mixture a bit with a stick or something similar. If you used old candles or wax drippings, get the used wicks out of the mixture by using used wooden spoons. Also, try and make sure your wax doesn’t catch fire – if it does – cover the lid and turn off thats stove. Water on wax fires makes it worse and ruins the wax. A sure warning sign for wax about to go up in flames is if it’s starting to boil.

Finally, it’s time for you to pour the wax into the molds and set the wicks. Always cut you candle wicks a little longer than your molds to make sure that your candles can be lit. Wicks can be made from simple strings so it’ll be easy to make.

And there you have it – candles made right there in your own home.

So how do you start? Well, here’s a short list of what you’ll need: a double boiler, some wax – usually paraffin but there are other waxes available on the market, short wicks, molds for the wax, and, if you’re feeling confident, some perfume or dyes.

Let’s start with a double boiler. You can probably buy something like it one the market but if you’re pinching pennies, setting something up as a double boiler is simple. All you have to do is fill a large low boiling pot with water and place a coffee can or something similar in the center. That’s where you boil the wax. Make sure that the boiler you have in the pan is steady and standing, not floating. The water level should be enough to provide water but not have it disrupt melting the wax.

Once that’s ready, you just dump the wax into the center boiler and wait for it to melt. You can acquire fresh wax from different sources: beeswax, fresh paraffin wax, and other wax products are available on the market. You can even recycle old wax from spent candles. Just cut up the wax chunks into small manageable pieces so that they would melt faster. A good starting weight that you can work with would be a half-pound of any wax that you’re using.

Once you have completely melted the wax you can dump mix in anything that needs to be mixed. Dyes are usually put in during this stage to give the candles some color. Aromatic mixtures are also put in this to provide various scents when you are trying to make scented candles. When you’re starting out however, it is best to begin with simple wax candles. If you do want to be fancy on your first try. Crush a few crayons and mix them into the wax with a stick or something similar. Never use a cooking instrument when making candles unless you don’t plan to use it again.

Now take your molds – this can be anything from siple cups to shaped bowl, and pour in the wax. Be careful in selecting your molds. Empty cans are one of the products yo be avoided. You have to make sure your mold is something that can easily be broken or something from which your candles can be easily extracted from. A simple tip is to place some waxpaper around the inside of the mold so as to facilitate easy extraction.Another tip is to look for molds that have wide mouths so as to make sure your candles can be easily taken.

While the wax is cooling, you will have to place the wicks. It’s pretty simple really – you just dip the long wicks into the wax mixture as it cools. Cut them a bit longer tha your mold so you can be assured that your candle’s wick can be lit.

And there you are – candlemaking made easy.

A Little Light: Making Your Own Candles For Fun And Profit

Now in our grim economic times, it’s always good to know a few skills that would help you earn or save an extra buck or two. These skills can range from anything like being a skilled transcriptionist or making soap. Creating your own candles at home is one of the simpler skills you can learn.

It should also be noted that candle-making is also often treated as a hobby by some people. It’s good to be able to relax and earning money from something that relaxes you is often a good thing.

So how do you start? Well, here’s a short list of what you’ll need: a double boiler, some wax – usually paraffin but there are other waxes available on the market, short wicks, molds for the wax, and, if you’re feeling confident, some perfume or dyes.

Let’s start with a double boiler. You can probably buy something like it one the market but if you’re pinching pennies, setting something up as a double boiler is simple. All you have to do is fill a large low boiling pot with water and place a coffee can or something similar in the center. That’s where you boil the wax. Make sure that the boiler you have in the pan is steady and standing, not floating. The water level should be enough to provide water but not have it disrupt melting the wax.

Once that’s ready, you just dump the wax into the center boiler and wait for it to melt. You can acquire fresh wax from different sources: beeswax, fresh paraffin wax, and other wax products are available on the market. You can even recycle old wax from spent candles. Just cut up the wax chunks into small manageable pieces so that they would melt faster. A good starting weight that you can work with would be a half-pound of any wax that you’re using.

Once you have completely melted the wax you can dump mix in anything that needs to be mixed. Dyes are usually put in during this stage to give the candles some color. Aromatic mixtures are also put in this to provide various scents when you are trying to make scented candles. When you’re starting out however, it is best to begin with simple wax candles. If you do want to be fancy on your first try. Crush a few crayons and mix them into the wax with a stick or something similar. Never use a cooking instrument when making candles unless you don’t plan to use it again.

Now take your molds – this can be anything from siple cups to shaped bowl, and pour in the wax. Be careful in selecting your molds. Empty cans are one of the products yo be avoided. You have to make sure your mold is something that can easily be broken or something from which your candles can be easily extracted from. A simple tip is to place some waxpaper around the inside of the mold so as to facilitate easy extraction.Another tip is to look for molds that have wide mouths so as to make sure your candles can be easily taken
While the wax is cooling, you will have to place the wicks. It’s pretty simple really – you just dip the long wicks into the wax mixture as it cools. Cut them a bit longer tha your mold so you can be assured that your candle’s wick can be lit.

And there you are – candlemaking made easy.