Why Is It Important For Children To Learn Speaking Spanish

Many parents usually don’t see the need of teaching kids Spanish, reasoning that English remains the most commonly spoken language in the world. That if the children can talk in English, they can basically communicate with the rest of the world. That notion, however, is utterly wrong. Given that there are more English speakers than most languages in the world, limiting the kids to only one language blocks out many opportunities for them. Spanish, in the first place, has become a global language, belonging to the same league as English. So to say that to learn speaking Spanish is useless is very old-fashioned.

Allowing the kids to learn Spanish is not just about being bilingual, although that in itself opens up many opportunities for them. If they know Spanish, they will be able to cross and appreciate other cultures, which they would otherwise have no idea of. Spanish-speaking countries, after all, are historically and culturally rich, whose people gave birth to a wealth of arts and literary masterpieces. Although it is still possible for the kids to appreciate Spanish culture without learning the language, nothing replaces the bliss of having a formidable bridge—the Spanish language—to cross that culture.

Children are very inquisitive. And at an early age, they desire to see a world beyond their own. Spanish language can provide them with this opportunity by giving them the ability to communicate with Spanish-speaking classmates or neighbors. A report shows that a large percentage of Spanish speakers, at least in the US, are children, and if the goal is to allow the English-speaking kids widen their world, wouldn’t it be practical to break the language barrier and let them form friendship with the Spanish-speaking kids?

Early introduction to the Spanish language also improves the children’s critical thinking ability. When learning a new language, mental capacities are challenged and are therefore trained to think more comprehensively. And this will not only help the kids in learning the language but also in their daily mental activities. However, many may argue that teaching kids Spanish may force them to think harder than is necessary. This is wrong. Researches point out that the part of the brain that is active when learning a new language is in fact most responsive at ages 3 to 6. Therefore, learning Spanish at this point is not in any way contradictory to the natural skills of the kids. It actually utilizes the kids’ optimum potential for learning a foreign language.

Now that all efforts are heading toward globalization, it is all the more important for kids to learn Spanish. The times are changing, and it is only necessary to prepare the kids for whatever changes that may arise. To allow the kids to learn speaking Spanish is to allow them to cope with the society and to make them more relevant in the modern times. Although teaching them Spanish is still a matter of choice, there is no inherently wrong in equipping the children to be a useful member of the society.